Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Yes We Can, Yes We Did, Yes We Will! But Sometimes Not.

I am OVERJOYED at the election results for the Presidential campaign. Obama ran an outstanding campaign. I didn't see it but I hear that McCain's concession speech was one of the best. "Sen. Obama and I have had and argued our differences, and he has prevailed. No doubt many of those differences remain. These are difficult times for our country. And I pledge to him tonight to do all in my power to help him lead us through the many challenges we face. I urge all Americans who supported me to join me in not just congratulating him, but offering our next president our good will and earnest effort to find ways to come together to find the necessary compromises to bridge our differences and help restore our prosperity, defend our security in a dangerous world, and leave our children and grandchildren a stronger, better country than we inherited." I did wake up and got to hear most of Obama's speech. If you missed it, you can read the transcript (or watch the video) here. I love the thanks he gave to his wife and daughters. "And I would not be standing here tonight without the unyielding support of my best friend for the last 16 years the rock of our family, the love of my life, the nation's next first lady Michelle Obama. Sasha and Malia I love you both more than you can imagine. And you have earned the new puppy that's coming with us to the new White House." But my favorite part, the part that moved me and inspired me... "This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that's on my mind tonight's about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She's a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing: Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old. She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn't vote for two reasons -- because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin. And tonight, I think about all that she's seen throughout her century in America -- the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress; the times we were told that we can't, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes we can. At a time when women's voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes we can. When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land, she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs, a new sense of common purpose. Yes we can. When the bombs fell on our harbor and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness and a democracy was saved. Yes we can. She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma, and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that "We Shall Overcome." Yes we can. A man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination. And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen, and cast her vote, because after 106 years in America, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change. Yes we can." I am saddened this morning by the news trickling in that California voters went Yes on Proposition 8. I think Andrew Sullivan of the Atlantic presented it best, with more hope than I am able to see at this moment. This was one battle. The war is still to be won. Yes We Can.

1 comment:

Sarah said...

Yesterday was a GREAT day. I still have trouble believing this really happened!

However, I am a little sad about the results on the propositions dealing with GLBT issues - http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/results/ballot.measures/ Not a good day for gay rights.